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Data and Models as Social Objects in the HydroShare System for Collaboration in the Hydrology Community and Beyond


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Created: Dec 12, 2016 at 9:58 p.m.
Last updated: Dec 14, 2016 at 7:07 a.m.
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Abstract

How do you share and publish hydrologic data and models for a large collaborative project? HydroShare is a new, web-based system for sharing hydrologic data and models with specific functionality aimed at making collaboration easier. HydroShare has been developed with U.S. National Science Foundation support under the auspices of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) to support the collaboration and community cyberinfrastructure needs of the hydrology research community. Within HydroShare, we have developed new functionality for creating datasets, describing them with metadata, and sharing them with collaborators. We cast hydrologic datasets and models as “social objects” that can be shared, collaborated around, annotated, published and discovered. In addition to data and model sharing, HydroShare supports web application programs (apps) that can act on data stored in HydroShare, just as software programs on your PC act on your data locally. This can free you from some of the limitations of local computing capacity and challenges in installing and maintaining software on your own PC. HydroShare’s web-based cyberinfrastructure can take work off your desk or laptop computer and onto infrastructure or "cloud" based data and processing servers. This presentation will describe HydroShare’s collaboration functionality that enables both public and private sharing with individual users and collaborative user groups, and makes it easier for collaborators to iterate on shared datasets and models, creating multiple versions along the way, and publishing them with a permanent landing page, metadata description, and citable Digital Object Identifier (DOI) when the work is complete. This presentation will also describe the web app architecture that supports interoperability with third party servers functioning as application engines for analysis and processing of big hydrologic datasets. While developed to support the cyberinfrastructure needs of the hydrology community, the informatics infrastructure for programmatic interoperability of web resources has a generality beyond the solution of hydrology problems that will be discussed.

Presentation IN33C-03: at AGU Fall Meeting December 14, 2016

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Content

This resource belongs to the following collections:
Title Owners Sharing Status My Permission
Presentations about HydroShare David Tarboton  Public &  Shareable Open Access

Credits

Funding Agencies

This resource was created using funding from the following sources:
Agency Name Award Title Award Number
National Science Foundation Collaborative Research: SI2-SSI: An Interactive Software Infrastructure for Sustaining Collaborative Community Innovation in the Hydrologic Sciences ACI 1148453 and ACI-1148090

How to Cite

Tarboton, D., R. Idaszak, J. S. Horsburgh, D. Ames, J. Goodall, L. Band, V. Merwade, A. Couch, R. Hooper, D. Maidment, P. Dash, M. J. Stealey, H. Yi, T. Gan, A. M. Castronova, B. Miles, Z. (. Li, M. Morsy, S. Crawley, M. Ramirez, J. Sadler, Z. Xue, C. Bandaragoda (2016). Data and Models as Social Objects in the HydroShare System for Collaboration in the Hydrology Community and Beyond, HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/099ae83fa8ee434a86d02b5596373ecf

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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