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Error Assessment for Height Above the Nearest Drainage Inundation Mapping


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Created: Mar 21, 2019 at 11:57 p.m.
Last updated: Mar 24, 2019 at 10:20 p.m.
DOI: 10.4211/hs.e2cca000bbd14538b02c79358bb6e1d6
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Sharing Status: Published
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Abstract

This is the repository for the paper "Error Assessment for Height Above the Nearest Drainage Inundation Mapping" by Lukas Godbout, Jeff Y. Zheng, Sayan Dey, Damilola Eyelade, David Maidment, and Paola Passalacqua. Please direct all communication to LukasGodbout@utexas.edu.

Real time flood inundation mapping is vital for emergency response to help protect life and property. Inundation mapping transforms rainfall forecasts into meaningful spatial information that can be utilized before, during and after disasters. While inundation mapping has traditionally been conducted on a local scale, automated algorithms using topography data can be utilized to efficiently produce flood maps across the continental scale. The Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND) method can be used in conjunction with Synthetic Rating Curves (SRCs) to produce inundation maps, but the performance of these inundation maps needs to be assessed. Here we assess the accuracy of the SRCs and calculate statistics for comparing the SRCs to rating curves obtained from hydrodynamic modeling calibrated against observed stage heights. We find that SRCs are accurate enough for large scale approximate inundation mapping while not accurate when assessing individual reaches or cross sections. We investigate the effect of terrain and channel characteristics and observe that reach length and slope predict divergence between the two types of rating curves, and that SRCs perform poorly for short reaches with extreme slope values. We propose an approach to recalculate the slope in Manning’s equation as the weighted average over a minimum distance and assess accuracy for a range of moving window lengths.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
Texas
North Latitude
31.6565°
East Longitude
-94.9541°
South Latitude
27.9200°
West Longitude
-99.3267°

Content

Readme.txt

This is the repository for the paper "Error Assessment for Height Above the Nearest Drainage Inundation Mapping."
Authors: Lukas Godbout, Jeff Y. Zheng, Sayan Dey, Damilola Eyelade, David Maidment, and Paola Passalacqua.
Please direct all communication to LukasGodbout@utexas.edu.

This repository includes four base folders:

1. Scripts
2. Inputs
3. Results

The scripts folder contains the four scripts designed for this study in addition to an initial scripts folder. All scripts are designed to run on Python 2.7.13 (32 bit).
The initial scripts folder contains scripts and a tutorial designed and provided by Dr. Xing Zheng, following the method presented in Zheng, X., D.G. Tarboton, D.R. Maidment, Y.Y. Liu & P. Passalacqua. (2018). River Channel Geometry and Rating Curve Estimation using Height Above the Nearest Drainage. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA), in press.
Please refer to the tutorial provided on how to create the input files used for our study.

The four scripts designed for this study are to be run individually for each river. The scripts shown use Guadalupe River as the example. Guadalupe river is in HUC-6 121002.
The Rating_Curve_Comparison script takes the input data and transforms it to allow for comparison between SRCs and HEC-RAS reach averaged rating curves.
The Rating_Curve_Evaluation script calculates statistics to evaluate SRC performance against HEC-RAS reach averaged rating curves.
The HAND_Moving_Window_Analysis script calculates new slope values for short reaches over a specified moving window length.
The Averaged_NRMSE script aggregates the new SRCs to calculate mean normalized RMSE for the set of moving window lengths.

The input folder contains the files output from the initial scripts for each river and information available online.
Each river has a NHD cross section spreadsheet containing the list of cross sections within each reach.
Each river has a COMID Max Station spreadsheet containing the most upstream cross section of each reach.
Each river has a Final Rating Curves spreadsheet containing all the stage height discharge relationships for each reach.
There are two general files for each HUC-6, where the Hydroprop spreadsheet contains reach geometry information and the NHD spreadsheet contains relevant NHDPlus attributes.
For other rivers new required input files can be found categorized by HUC-6 at https://web.corral.tacc.utexas.edu/nfiedata/HAND/.

The results folder contains the main result spreadsheets and the depth difference spreadsheets.
The main result spreadsheets display for each reach the RMSE, normalized RMSE, max error, range, percent bias and R squared.
The depth difference spreadsheets display for each reach the median and mean absolute depth difference, reach length, reach slope, bankfull width and bankfull depth values.
The scaling analysis spreadsheets show the mean normalized RMSE values for a set of moving window lengths.

References

Sources

Derived From: NFIE Continental Flood Inundation Mapping - Data Repository - https://web.corral.tacc.utexas.edu/nfiedata/HAND/

How to Cite

Godbout, L. (2019). Error Assessment for Height Above the Nearest Drainage Inundation Mapping, HydroShare, https://doi.org/10.4211/hs.e2cca000bbd14538b02c79358bb6e1d6

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

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