Hi, I'm an error. x

Jezra Beaulieu

Nooksack Indian Tribe | Water Resources Specialist

Subject Areas: hydrology, sediment transport, stream temperature, GIS, climate change, glaciers, restoration, data management

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

The following tutorial demonstrates how to use HydroClient to search for, download, and visualize time series data from multiple sources. This example uses data located in the North Fork Nooksack Watershed, but the same procedure to download data for other stations is identical and can be followed to get air temperature and several other parameters for other locations in the United States and around the world.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

Air temperature, ground temperature and relative humidity data were collected in a longitudinal transect of the Nooksack watershed at varying elevations from 500 to 1800 m above sea level. Data were collected by anchoring sensors from trees above winter snow levels and shaded from direct solar radiation. Paired sensors were also buried 3 cm under ground near each air temperature sensor to determine snow absence or presence. Select sites included relative humidity sensors to indicate whether precipitation was occurring. Data were collected every 3-4 h from December 2015 to Sept 2018 (with ongoing collection). Code for analysis of daily mean, minimum, maximum, and temperature change with elevation (lapse rates) are available on Github (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3239539). The sensor download and intermediate data products are available on HydroShare at (http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/222e832d3df24dea9bae9bbeb6f4219d) with publicly accessible visualization available from the Nooksack Observatory at data.cuahsi.org. Hydrologic models are generally structured with a single annual average lapse rate parameter which assumes a linear temperature gradient with elevation. The daily data (2016-2018) is used as part of ongoing studies on the non-linear dynamics and temporal variability of temperature with elevation to improve assessments of watershed function and salmon habitat.

Please see Related Resources Section and Readme.md for additional citation information related to this resource.

Land Acknowledgement: The Coast Salish people are the indigenous inhabitants of Western Washington. The Nooksack Watershed, from the peak of Mount Baker to the Bellingham Bay, is the unceded ancestral land of the Nooksack Tribe and Lummi Nation. They are still here, continuing to honor and bring to light their ancient heritage. The University of Washington acknowledges the Coast Salish peoples of this land, the land which touches the shared waters of all tribes and bands within the Suquamish, Tulalip and Muckleshoot nations.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

Air temperature, ground temperature and relative humidity data was collected in a longitudinal transect of the Nooksack watershed at varying elevations from 500 - 1800 m above sea level. Data was collected by anchoring sensors from trees above winter snow levels and shaded from direct solar radiation. Paired sensors were also buried 3 cm under ground near each air temperature sensor to determine snow absence or presence. Selected sites included relative humidity sensors to indicate whether precipitation was occuring. Data was collected every 3-4 hours from May 2015 to Sept 2018 (with ongoing collection). Code for processing daily mean, minimum, maximum, and rates of temperature changes with elevation is available on Github (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3239539). The sensor download and intermediate data products are available on HydroShare with publicly accessible visualization available from the Nooksack Observatory at data.cuahsi.org.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

This resource includes both GIS location data and data associated with sediment and turbidity monitoring in the Nooksack River watershed.

Show More

 Contact

Resources
All 0
Collection 0
Composite Resource 0
Generic 0
Geographic Feature 0
Geographic Raster 0
HIS Referenced Time Series 0
Model Instance 0
Model Program 0
MODFLOW Model Instance Resource 0
Multidimensional (NetCDF) 0
Script Resource 0
SWAT Model Instance 0
Time Series 0
Web App 0
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Turbidity and Sediment Monitoring
Created: May 6, 2016, 7:59 p.m.
Authors: Jezra Beaulieu

ABSTRACT:

This resource includes both GIS location data and data associated with sediment and turbidity monitoring in the Nooksack River watershed.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

Air temperature, ground temperature and relative humidity data was collected in a longitudinal transect of the Nooksack watershed at varying elevations from 500 - 1800 m above sea level. Data was collected by anchoring sensors from trees above winter snow levels and shaded from direct solar radiation. Paired sensors were also buried 3 cm under ground near each air temperature sensor to determine snow absence or presence. Selected sites included relative humidity sensors to indicate whether precipitation was occuring. Data was collected every 3-4 hours from May 2015 to Sept 2018 (with ongoing collection). Code for processing daily mean, minimum, maximum, and rates of temperature changes with elevation is available on Github (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3239539). The sensor download and intermediate data products are available on HydroShare with publicly accessible visualization available from the Nooksack Observatory at data.cuahsi.org.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

Air temperature, ground temperature and relative humidity data were collected in a longitudinal transect of the Nooksack watershed at varying elevations from 500 to 1800 m above sea level. Data were collected by anchoring sensors from trees above winter snow levels and shaded from direct solar radiation. Paired sensors were also buried 3 cm under ground near each air temperature sensor to determine snow absence or presence. Select sites included relative humidity sensors to indicate whether precipitation was occurring. Data were collected every 3-4 h from December 2015 to Sept 2018 (with ongoing collection). Code for analysis of daily mean, minimum, maximum, and temperature change with elevation (lapse rates) are available on Github (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3239539). The sensor download and intermediate data products are available on HydroShare at (http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/222e832d3df24dea9bae9bbeb6f4219d) with publicly accessible visualization available from the Nooksack Observatory at data.cuahsi.org. Hydrologic models are generally structured with a single annual average lapse rate parameter which assumes a linear temperature gradient with elevation. The daily data (2016-2018) is used as part of ongoing studies on the non-linear dynamics and temporal variability of temperature with elevation to improve assessments of watershed function and salmon habitat.

Please see Related Resources Section and Readme.md for additional citation information related to this resource.

Land Acknowledgement: The Coast Salish people are the indigenous inhabitants of Western Washington. The Nooksack Watershed, from the peak of Mount Baker to the Bellingham Bay, is the unceded ancestral land of the Nooksack Tribe and Lummi Nation. They are still here, continuing to honor and bring to light their ancient heritage. The University of Washington acknowledges the Coast Salish peoples of this land, the land which touches the shared waters of all tribes and bands within the Suquamish, Tulalip and Muckleshoot nations.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

The following tutorial demonstrates how to use HydroClient to search for, download, and visualize time series data from multiple sources. This example uses data located in the North Fork Nooksack Watershed, but the same procedure to download data for other stations is identical and can be followed to get air temperature and several other parameters for other locations in the United States and around the world.

Show More